Archive | March 2016

Sherman- Hood Letters

 

 These letters between Grant and Sherman reflect a mindset that I fell has departed from our world, Sad to say. Their discourse, although passionate, displays a certain respect of person, not found very often today.  this first letter is General Sherman speaking of his intentions for the people of Atlanta, after it’s  lost by the Confederate Army. Shades of “Gone with the Wind”

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General Sherman had been saddled with running the cities of Memphis and Vicksburg after the Confederate troops with drew he didn’t want that job again. For those of you unaware, Rough and Ready was a train depot south of Atlanta, and Lovejoy was another a bit farther south, it was also the site of the last battle fought in the Atlanta Campaign. Gen. Hood remained there until mid Sept.  The return letter from Hood is a bit testy.

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Signed : John Bell Hood, General Commanding, Army of Tennessee.

I will tell you as this series of letters goes farther they do get a bit longer. I do hope you find them to be interesting a  study into the minds of great men in a time of adversity.

Thanks,

Larry Murley

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The Fall of Atlanta, Sept 1, 1864

In my research for my soon to be released Historical Novel, After Bloody Shiloh, I discovered many interesting stories and articles that I would like to share with you. One of these concerned the d…

Source: The Fall of Atlanta, Sept 1, 1864

The Fall of Atlanta, Sept 1, 1864

In my research for my soon to be released Historical Novel, After Bloody Shiloh, I discovered many interesting stories and articles that I would like to share with you. One of these concerned the disposition of the population of Atlanta,  Georgia, after it fell to the Union Army, commanded by General William T. Sherman. It created a bit of contriversy , as you may well imagine. I will let the correspondence between General Sherman and General John Bell Hood, and the Civil governers of Atlanta, do my talking. This first blog is short and is mostly just General Sherman

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Basically General Sherman’s reasoning was he couldn’t leave Atlanta,

to function as normal, He had been the commander of both Memphis, TN and

Vicksburg, Mississippi, after the Southern Forces  had been defeated there. He, in his mind, simply must totally defeat the Confederate forces, in order to bring the Civil War to an end. Since Atlanta, was a huge manufacturing and supply center it must be totally shut it down.  And this is where it got interesting. Atlanta, boasted a population of 10,000 souls, but because it had become a hospital city by the time it fell it had doubled in population to 20,000. What to do with all those people.   These excerpts are from the memoirs of General Sherman and are given exactly as he told the story. The letters you will read are copies that he had kept in his possession.